As the MDGs become SDGs, what progress has WASH Results made?

What has the DFID WASH Results Programme achieved so far and what lies ahead for the programme in 2016?

January 1st, 2016 is an important date for the DFID WASH Results Programme. The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) take the place of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and ‘WASH Results’ moves into the second half of its funding period. At this stage the focus for the programme’s Suppliers (SAWRP, SNV and SWIFT) will start shifting from getting things done, to keeping things going and ensuring the sustainability of WASH outcomes. For e-Pact too, as the independent verifiers, it’s farewell to Outputs and hello to Outcomes.

Once the goals to provide access have been reached, attention turns to sustainability.

Before we look ahead to next year, let’s take a look at what’s been achieved so far. According to the UN, 2.6 billion people gained access to improved drinking water sources between 1990 and 2015 – a key part of MDG 7. Worldwide, 2.1 billion people have gained access to improved sanitation but 2.4 billion are still using unimproved sanitation facilities, including nearly 1 billion people who are still defecating in the open. This July, DFID was able to report it had exceeded its own target of supporting 60 million people to access clean water, better sanitation or improved hygiene conditions.

What contribution can we attribute to the WASH Results Programme? The full report on the programme’s 2015 Annual Review is available on the UKAid Development Tracker website. Here are some of the highlights:

  • The reviewers gave the programme an ‘A’ overall (for the second year running) and considered it to be “on track” to meeting its targets by the end of 2015.
  • By December 2014 the WASH Results Programme had reached 296,438 people with improved sanitation, 65,611 people with improved water supply, and over 1.25 million people with hygiene promotion.
  • The reviewers noted that “strong independent verification systems” have been established that also allow for adjustment and improvement based on learning from previous verification rounds.
  • WASH Results is generating significant policy knowledge around use of Payment by Results and programming for outcomes (sustainability) in the WASH sector.

We’ll come back to these results in early 2016 when the final numbers are in and compare them to the programme’s targets for December 2015 which are:

  • 968,505 people have access to clean drinking water;
  • 3,769,708 people have access to an improved sanitation facility;
  • 9,330,144 people reached through hygiene promotion activities through DFID support.

Large numbers, however impressive, don’t fully convey the effects that improvements in water, sanitation and hygiene are having on people’s lives. The Suppliers have been collecting stories of change from some of the people on the ground who are closely involved in delivering the WASH Results Programme or directly benefitting from its work. You can read about 70 year old subsistence farmer Maria and mother-of-five, Jacinta, in a recent DFID blog post. The SWIFT consortium’s website is also packed with news and images from their involvement in the WASH Results Programme.

So what happens next?

From 2016 onwards, e-Pact starts answering a critical question for DFID: how many poor people continue to use improved water and sanitation facilities and are practising improved hygiene because of the WASH Results Programme? Right now we’re exploring how best to monitor, report on and verify these outcomes and look forward to sharing what we learn, with you.

As always, if you have any ideas or observations about this topic, we encourage you to Leave A Reply (below), or email us.

One response to “As the MDGs become SDGs, what progress has WASH Results made?

  1. Pingback: What have we learned about Payment by Results (PBR) programmes from verifying one? | Learning about Payment by Results in Water, Sanitation & Hygiene (WASH)

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